Tel Aviv

Can Unal
Solaf Balisany
Deeqa Kabadeh
Can Unal
Can Unal
Can Unal
Michal Kroll
Sonny Medcalf
Sonny Medcalf
Laura Aldridge
Laura Aldridge
Laura Aldridge
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In 2009 Tel Aviv celebrated the centenary of its foundation. As an extension of Jaffa, the world’s oldest port, modern day Tel Aviv grew out of the sand dunes within the framework of a garden city urban plan by Patrick Geddes, the Scottish city theorist. 


The nomenclature of the UNESCO listed White City refers to a collection of over 4,000 International Style buildings. They were constructed within the Geddes plan by German Jewish graduates of the Bauhaus who were immigrated to the British Mandate of Palestine after the rise of the Nazis Party. During a period of incredible production between 1932–1936 the displaced architects sought to address the dichotomy of creating a new home and identity on land they believed to be their ancient and spiritual home. This was achieved through the climatic and contextual adaptation of Modernism to form their own architectural idiom.


Like all countries Israel exists within defined boundaries, albeit boundaries that prove more ‘flexible’ than most. These borders contain thriving high-tech, financial, service and agriculture industries that support and depend on a highly educated population that fluctuates at an unpredictable rate – the Law of Return grants anyone of Jewish ancestry the right of return to live in Israel and gain citizenship. The inextricable and fractious alliance between religion and state that so often defines Israel complicates the relationship between Israel and its neighbours. As a result of their perceived isolation Israel is becoming increasingly convinced of the need to be self sufficient in terms of resources, placing even greater value on available land for the production of food for consumption and export. As a result cities are required to accommodate the increasing population within their existing boundaries.


The city of Tel Aviv has begun to implement its 2020 Plan – a masterplan intended to dictate the growth of the city through the strategic placement of clusters of residential and commercial towers. These tower clusters are zoned in response to existing infrastructure and land use, but all defer to the areas of protected 3–5 storey buildings that form the city's historical heart. At the southern end of Rothschild Boulevard, the grand avenue in Geddes’ plan, beyond the protected White City lies a proposed cluster of residential towers of between 28 and 44 floors. Each student has been allocated a site within this area of the 2020 Plan and been asked to develop a contemporary response to building meaningfully within the influence of the protected White City.